Highlights

Arming Mother Nature

Winner, 2014 Paul Birdsall Prize, American Historical Association

jakehamblin1

Associate Professor of History, Oregon State University

“Reading Arming Mother Nature… is like stepping into the most terrifying nightmares of Dr. Strangelove.” -–Paolo Mastrolilli,  La Stampa

“Literary lovechild of Richard Rhodes’ Making of the Atomic Bomb and Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring.” –Slate

“In Arming Mother Nature, Jacob Hamblin offers a far-reaching and provocative account of just how dependent narratives of global climate change are upon the military support, apocalyptic scenarios, and political ideology that shaped the growth of the modern environmental sciences during the Cold War.” -–Gregg Mitman, Science

“Jacob Hamblin’s new book is a clearly and calmly told tale of the American effort to conscript nature — from the seafloor to the stratosphere — for potential active duty during the Cold War… It sheds new light on the old adage that it is a miracle anyone survived the Cold War.” –-J.R. McNeill, Georgetown University

A carefully crafted, powerfully articulated study of one of the most important dimensions of today’s environmental policy debate…. The book is a weighty example of the importance of environmental history research in relation to the public realm.” –Richard P. Tucker, Environmental History

The author of  Arming Mother Nature and other books, Jacob Darwin Hamblin writes about the history and politics of science, technology, and environmental issues. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Salon, and many publications devoted to the history of science, technology, and the natural world. He currently resides in the American Pacific Northwest, where he is an associate professor of history at Oregon State University.

Arming Mother Nature: The Birth of Catastrophic Environmentalism is a book that challenges us to consider how much our views of global environmental change come from collaboration between scientists and the military as they planned to fight, and to survive, a third world war. His previous book, Poison in the Well: Radioactive Waste in the Oceans at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age, was the first international history of one of the least-understood environmental controversies of the twentieth century. An earlier book, Oceanographers and the Cold War, explores the reasons for the explosive growth of the marine sciences after World War II.

You can email him here.